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Why JPEGs are Bad for Print

When it comes to images, JPEGs are the undisputed king of the hill. With roughly 70% of websites using JPEGs and most digital cameras and camcorders, including the ones on smart phones and tablets, JPEGs have a huge market share on the Internet and with electronic devices that use images. The advantages of this file format, particularly on the web or devices with limited internal memory, is that they offer a decent image quality with an impressive reduction in file size.

So why doesn't your printer like them? Why do they roll their eyes and make a face at the mere mention of this useful and nearly ubiquitous file format?

Topics: Design Tips File Preparation General Info Tips & Tricks

No Respect? Why Print Remains a Force to be Reckoned With

Let’s face it, print has become the Rodney Dangerfield of marketing channels – it gets no respect. Sure, website analytics, Email best-practices, and emerging channels like mobile and social are glitzy and exciting, but are they really better than direct mail? After all, shouldn’t the most important measurement of the success of a marketing channel be based on recipient preference?

According to a recent study by Chief Marketing Magazine, consumers say they like print. While the focus of marketers has been on digital marketing channels, “old school, expensive” printed direct mail has been under the radar getting the job done. According to the study, 6/10 Americans (and 7/10 Canadians) enjoy getting direct mail to learn about new products. This preference toward direct mail spans all industry categories and age groups, including the tech-savvy generation of 18-35 year-olds.

Topics: Direct Mail General Info Mailing Marketing Print Marketing

“Moneyball” Lessons for Marketers, Printers, Publishers, (and everybody else)

 

 

It’s not too often that a Sunday afternoon at the movie theater results in a business epiphany. But that’s exactly what happened to me at a recent viewing of Brad Pitt’s latest blockbuster, “Moneyball”. “Moneyball” is a dramatization of Michael Lewis’ 2003 best-selling book of the same name, which presented an inside look at the inner-workings of the Oakland Athletics font-office operations and the team’s General Manager, Billy Beane. The A’s, despite being one of the most cash-strapped organizations in the Major Leagues, were one the winningest teams in baseball in the early 2000s.

In his book, Lewis detailed the unconventional methods by which Beane assembled his rosters in those years. While other teams focused on more qualitative methods of player evaluation (“the ball really pops of his bat”, “he’s got a good ballplayer’s body”) and filled their front offices with scouts and ex-ballplayers, Beane surrounded himself with statisticians and economists. Beane and his cohorts sought to exploit market inefficiencies in player evaluation through advanced statistical analysis to find and sign undervalued players in order to allow themselves to be competitive within their (relatively) severe budgetary constraints. In 2002, the A’s supplemented their core of MVP shortstop Miguel Tejada, third-baseman Eric Chavez, and the terrific “Big 3” starting rotation of Tim Hudson, Mark Mulder, and Cy Young Award winner Barry Zito, with a brand of low-risk baseball that placed high-value on performance metrics such as on-base percentage and slugging percentage. That year, the A’s amateur draft strategy also reflected a similar philosophy and focused primarily on statistical analysis and undervalued college-level players. Beane’s strategy worked wonders; the A’s won 103 games (costing an average of $388,349 per win, whereas the New York Yankees would pay more than $1.2 million for each of their 103 wins that season) and enjoyed another trip to the post-season.

Topics: General Info Marketing Marketing Strategy Opinion Business call to action ROI

Understanding Content Management Systems

When we talk about modern web sites a phrase that gets thrown around a lot is Content Management Systems, or CMS, but have you ever wondered what exactly is a Content Management System? Maybe you've wondered how exactly your business or organization could benefit from using a CMS? Well in this article we'll walk you through what a CMS is, some common questions and answers, and the pros and cons of deploying a web site using CMS.

Topics: Content Management Digital Publishing General Info Website

The Digital Marketing Glossary

Organic Growth? SMS? ROMI?  The Digital Marketing world has no shortage of acronyms and jargon. Here's a few of the more common terms to help you make sense of all the 'marketing techie talk'.

Ad Server – Database driven software that assists in the placement and management of advertisements on websites.

Auto-responder – A message (normally Email) that is pre-written and automatically distributes when triggered by some sort of activity. One common application of an auto responder is an order-confirmation sent to a consumer upon purchase from an e-commerce platform such as Amazon.

Topics: Consultative Services General Info Marketing Marketing Services Marketing Tips Business

Report from Graph Expo 2010

Oh the times they are a changin’

 

“Well I guess this digital thing isn’t just a trend,” I overheard "Fred" say as I walked the floor of Graph Expo last week in Chicago. For those who don’t know, Graph Expo is the biggest annual Print and Graphic Communication trade show in North America. For "Fred" and other career printers like him, this year’s expo must have been a total cultural shock. Certainly, the past two years have not been easy on the printing industry. However, what was glaringly obvious is that out of that struggle has emerged a bright new digital future for the industry.

Topics: Consultative Services Cross-Media Marketing General Info Marketing Opinion Print

Casey's Print Dictionary

The Printing Industry is full of jargon that serves to confuse and frustrate customers and outsiders. Below are some common terms used in the printing industry.

Against the grain: Folding or feeding paper at right angles to the grain direction of the paper. On some stocks folding against the grain can result in quality control issues.

Aqueous Coating/Flood Coat: A coat of varnish applied to a sheet on press that protects a printed piece from scuffs and scratches.

Basic size: All papers have an assigned basic sized. For example; 25 x 38 for book papers, 20 x 26 for cover papers, 22 1/2 x 28 1/2 or 22 1/2 x 35 for bristols, 25 1/2 x 30 1/2 for index.

Basis weight: The weight in pounds of a ream (500 sheets) of paper at basic size (see above). Example, 50# Book paper: 500 sheets at basic size of 25" x 38" weighs 50 lbs.

Blanket: A rubber-surfaced fabric wrapped around a cylinder that is used to transfer an image from the plate to the paper. A primary component of offset printing.

Topics: General Info Tips & Tricks tips and tricks Print