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Why do we wear green on St. Patrick's Day?

The Casey Clan has deeps roots in Ireland so naturally we seek the truth regarding all things Irish (although we tend not to let too many facts get in the way of a good story!).

Topics: Opinion

Magazine Printing Companies in Northern California


We know we have competition...

For more than a century (since 1901) Casey Printing  has been helping northern California publishers print magazines and catalogs. For this reason we feel uniquely qualified to offer insights into printing resources in this area. Our customers have come to trust our judgement, so occasionally, when there is a project that does not fit our services for one reason or another, we are asked to suggest other sources of printing.

Topics: printing

How To Make a Print Ready File In Apple Keynote

So you want to build a print file in Keynote:

At CASEY, we wholeheartedly believe that you should always use the best tool for the job. For print layouts, we suggest using Adobe InDesign. Sometimes you've gotta work with the tools  you have though, and sometimes that tool is Keynote. 

Since Keynote is not designed for producing print files, there are some tricks to make it behave. Here's how to whip it into shape:

Topics: Design PDF

Cuesta Survey Gets Results

Executing a complex community survey is a challenge. Getting it into the hands of community members, generating excitement and interest, and getting those surveys returned and tabulated can be a daunting task.

That was just the job Stephan Gunsaulus, Cuesta’s Director of Marketing and Communications, was ready to tackle. Cuesta College was looking for an effective way to reach out to residents of San Luis Obispo County to provide input for the 2011-2016 Educational Master Plan. As an accomplished marketing veteran, Stephan knew an integrated approach, utilizing both print and digital delivery, would be needed. The question was how to execute such a strategy. Much to his delight, Casey literally walked in the door with the answer; Casey's new "cross-media" marketing solution.

Topics: Consultative Services Cross-Media Marketing Email Marketing Marketing Strategy Tips & Tricks Case Studies

How To Design a Book in InDesign (Free Template!)

If you're a self-publisher, chances are good that you're designing your own books. Unfortunately the tools we use for writing, like Word, don't always make for great book design. This is a job for industry-standard tools like Adobe InDesign. The good news is that pricing for InDesign has become very reasonable recently, but the bad news is it's still difficult to use. So you might still need a little help to get started.

That's why we've put together this basic how-to. Now you can build a book in InDesign that you can use time and again on as many books as you like!

Before we get started, take advantage of the free template download so you can follow along. Or if you would rather have us design a custom template for you, hit the "Talk to an Expert" button.

Download The InDesign Template › Talk to an Expert ›

Topics: Design Print

How to Create a Newsletter in InDesign

Sometimes the most difficult thing about starting a newsletter is... well... starting the newsletter. We have our contributors, we know what our goals are, we know who our audience is, and we know when we want to start, but we still have to build the thing.

Well here at CASEY we're not just great at printing newsletters, we have a lot of experience designing them as well, and know I'm going to share with you the basics of how to create a newsletter in InDesign.

Before we get started, download the InDesign template so you can follow along. Or if you would rather have us design the template for you, hit the "Talk to an Expert" button.

Download The InDesign Template ›   Talk to an Expert ›

Topics: Adobe Design

Typography Shop Talk: Web Design vs. Graphic Design

Even if you've never heard of the term “Shop Talk,” chances are still very good that you've heard shop talk, or may have even participated in it yourself. In a nutshell, shop talk is the jargon specific to an occupation or special interest. One common example of shop talk you may have participated in is sports jargon. Inning, Safety, Punt, Quarterback, Strike, Goal, Ball, Foul, Out, Steal, Error and so on. Photographers may refer to F-stops, Focal Lengths, ISO, Shutter Speeds & Megapixels, while designers may talk about Color Spaces, Color Theory, Wireframes, Mood Boards, Levels, Pixel Depth, Strokes and Fills. Whatever your profession or interest, there's likely some Shop Talk associated with it.

Today we're going to focus on Typography, and the curious case of two different trades that use their own very different Shop Talk to describe very similar concepts: Web Designers and Graphic Designers.

Topics: Typography

Understanding the Standard PDF Export Settings

Here at the shop we get this question surprisingly often: “What PDF settings should I use in my export, Standard Quality, High Quality or Press Quality?" This is typically in reference to the export or 'save as' options for PDFs available in Adobe InDesign, Illustrator or Photoshop, but can also pertain to any software that makes use of the standard profiles found in Acrobat Distiller. So now some of you may be asking:

Topics: Print

Why You Should Stop Selling on Facebook

Let's face it, the commercialization of Facebook is here. You can't log in without seeing the latest “#1 selling app that all your friends play," and you can't log out without seeing Flo the Progressive Girl selling you auto insurance. Suggested posts and sponsored ads abound in the modern Facebook landscape, and marketers are both cringing at and flocking towards Facebook's ad manager. Everyone wants a piece of the Facebook audience pie (more than 1.3 billion active monthly users), but many have no idea how to make it work for them. Therefor, I have some very basic advice that I hope will steer you in the right direction:

Topics: Social Media

Humanizing Your Marketing Efforts with Humor

If you've been keeping up on the midterm elections, you might've noticed that several of the political candidates this year have tried to use humor, in some form or another, in their political ads. From Terry Lynn's “Really” ad to Mitch McConnell's “What Rhymes with Alison Lundergan Grimes?” it seems that serious politicians everywhere have been trying to wisecrack their way into the poll booth. So why have serious politicians professing to have serious stands on serious issues taken such a frivolous approach to campaigning?

The answer is simple, really: the ads are an attempt to humanize the candidate and relate to the constituency. By showing their audience that they're human — that they laugh too, that they like to have fun and poke fun — they're shaking off the image of the power-hungry bureaucrat  who's only interest is self-gain and power, and they're building affinity towards an otherwise dry topic.

Topics: Marketing